Color Analysis

Summer Color Palettes – Light Summer, True Summer, Soft Summer

Summer Color Palettes

Summer is full of bright, vibrant colors. And while it’s pretty easy to combine a few of them into an outfit, sometimes you need a little help deciding exactly which shades and hues pair best together. Light summer is the most common of the summer color palettes. This color palette suits many different hair colors and skin undertones. Mastering a summer color palette can help you build a wardrobe that fits your personality and makes you feel confident.

I. Light Summer Colour Palette

Light Summer is reminiscent of mild summer mornings full of coolness and gentleness with a hint of freshness. The sun’s rays only touch the dew drops on the awakened foliage and flowers. The sky is of the most muted tones with floating, fluffy clouds. These colors are gentle and light, yet refreshing – like an early morning breeze at the beach.

The Palette

Light Summer combines lightness with coolness. Consequently, the colors are overall light in value to complement the appearance of a Light Summer. A few colors are medium in value, and those are just supporting colors for the light tints.

The palette contains medium-saturated, coolish colors, such as light pinks and delicate blue greens. There are no harsh contrasts between the colors, only nuances.

And while this season’s color palette has the typical coolness characteristic, with some warmth of its neighboring season, Spring. Moreover, Spring adds brightness and saturation to the otherwise muted Summer palette. This is the brightest and least faded season of the Summer family.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, Light Summer has the following settings:

Hue

The colors lean towards the cool end of the scale but are not very cool. That means they contain more blue than yellow undertones. So even if you choose yellow (which is the warmest color of all), you will find only cooler yellows that contain a tint of blue.

Value

In line with Light Summer’s primary aspect, the colors are light. Although you may find some medium shades, these are just supporting colors for the lighter tints. There are no dark colors on the palette. However, the palette does not include the very lightest colors. Those are Winter’s icy lights, which are closer to white than Light summer’s colors.

Chroma

The colors are medium in chroma, meaning they are neither very muted nor highly vibrant. However, the colors are brighter and more saturated than those of the other two Summer seasons because of Spring’s influence on them. But they don’t have the same intensity as Light Spring colors.

Sister Palettes

Light Summer sits between Light Spring and True Summer on the seasonal flow chart. It falls at the Spring end of the Summer palette, with colors lighter, brighter, and warmer than those of True Summer. They are surprisingly un-summery in their saturation level – almost bright enough to rival Light and True Spring’s palettes.

The colors are cooler, gentler, and slightly darker than Light Spring. Spring’s effect on Light Summer is added warmth and brightness. Spring also lightens the colors compared to the other two Summer palettes.
The colors are neutral-cool like those of the third Summer season, Soft Summer, but they are brighter and lighter.

Light Spring and True summer share Light Summer’s aspects of light and cool, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the Light Summer spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the Light Summer color palette.

If you lean more towards Light Spring, opt for the cooler shades on the Light Spring palette – such as Blue Topaz, Lavender, or Provence. If you lean more towards True Summer, choose the lighter colors on the True Summer palette – such as Chardonnay, Pink-a-boo, or Dutch Canal.

II. True Summer Colour Palette

true summer color analysis

True Summer is the color season reminiscent of summer days after rain when the last grey clouds disperse, and the haze refracts all the colors of nature into a kaleidoscope of contrasts. These colors are cool, calming, and refreshing, like the feeling of cool water on the skin. They are the colors of water – the blues and greens of rivers, lakes, and deep oceans.

The Palette

True Summer is the original Summer season of the four seasons color analysis and is the ‘standard’ Summer palette. The other two Summer palettes have been modified to accommodate Spring and Autumn’s respective influence.

True Summer coloring combines coolness with softness. This season falls at the coolest end of Summer. Consequently, the colors are cool with a clear blue undertone. There is not a hint of warmth in this palette.
The palette has the gentleness and delicacy typical of the Summer family. The colors are mid-range. And although there is a range of different hues, blues, turquoise, and greys, which are naturally cool, feature heavily on the palette. Cool browns and greyish blues work well as neutrals, accented by brighter hues, like pinks, purples, and greens.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, True Summer has the following settings:

Hue

In line with True Summer’s primary color aspect, the colors sit on the coolest end of the hue scale. That means they contain blue undertones but no yellow ones. There are very few yellow shades on the palette, and even those have a heavy tint of blue to cool them. Instead, you will find many naturally cool blues, turquoise, and greys.

Value

The color palette ranges from light grey to dark brown and is quite broad. Overall, though, more colors are medium or lighter than truly dark. This is because True Summer cannot handle too much contrast.

Chroma

The colors are medium in chroma and lean more towards the muted end of the scale. They are dusky and greyish rather than saturated and bright.

True Summer Sister Palettes

True summer sister palettes

True Summer sits between Light Summer and Soft Summer on the seasonal flow chart. It is the ‘standard’ Summer palette.

With its opposite season True Winter, the color palette shares the same cool temperature. But True Summer colors are lighter and gentler.

The colors are cooler, more muted, and slightly darker than Light summer.

The colors are somewhat brighter, cooler, and slightly lighter than in Soft summer. True Summer colors are not as desaturated as Soft Summer colors. And while True Summer neutrals are getting greyer, the complementary and accent colors on the palette retain some brightness.

Light Summer and Soft summer share True Summer’s characteristics of cool and muted, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the True Summer spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the True Summer color palette.

If you lean more towards Light Summer, opt for the darker and less bright colors on the Light Summer palette – such as Open Air, Aster Purple, and Sea Green. If you lean more towards Soft Summer, choose the brighter colors on the Soft Summer palette – such as Marlin, Storm Blue and Wild Rose.

III. Soft Summer Colour Palette

Soft Summer is the color season reminiscent of misty days when the heat carries the fog through the air after a cool summer rain. And the arrival of Autumn is not far away. These colors are gentle and mysterious. They contain so many cold and warm tones that their collision gives rise to a surprisingly harmonious image. And like a chameleon, this color season can show one side or another.

The Palette

True to Soft Summer’s primary color aspect, the colors are muted and gentle to match this season’s natural coloring’s low to medium contrast level.

The color palette includes desaturated, low-contrast, and coolish colors. Most of the colors are greys and blue-based colors with a heavy focus on pinks, purples, blues, and greens. The colors are not clear but complex and elusive, almost as if they consisted of many different colors.

Soft Summer sits on the border to Autumn. Summer is muted, cool, and light. Autumn is also muted. So adding Autumn to Summer makes the Soft Summer palette even more faded. But Autumn also brings warmth, adding a brownish element to the colors. Autumn also adds depth, and thus, Soft Summer colors are the darkest of the Summer family.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, Soft Summer has the following settings:

Hue

Thanks to Soft Summer’s secondary aspect, the colors lean towards the cool end of the scale but are not highly cool. That means they contain more blue than yellow undertones. As a result, you will find fewer shades of yellow (which is the warmest color of all), only cooler shades of yellow that have a tint of blue. Instead, there are more blues, pinks, and greys, naturally blue-based and thus cool.

Value

The color palette is medium in value, meaning neither light nor dark colors dominate it. And while there are lighter and darker colors, most of the colors fall somewhere in the middle of the value scale.

Chroma

In line with this season’s primary color aspect, Soft Summer has the least tolerance for brightness. Consequently, the colors have low chroma – meaning very desaturated, muted, or simply greyed-out.

Sister Palettes

Soft Summer sits between True Summer and Soft Autumn on the seasonal flow chart. It falls at the Autumn end of the Summer palette. And the colors are more muted, warmer, and ever so slightly darker than those of True Summer.

Compared to Soft Autumn, the colors are cooler and more greyish, but otherwise similar – both seasons are medium in value and muted.

Compared to the third Summer season, Light Summer, the colors share the same neutral cool temperature but are more muted and darker.

True Summer and Soft Autumn both share Soft Summer’s aspects of cool and muted, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the Soft Summer spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the Soft Summer color palette.

If you lean more towards True Summer, opt for the more muted colors on the True Summer palette – such as Moonlite Mauve, Baby Lavender, or Lichen Blue. If you lean more towards Soft Autumn, choose the cooler colors on the Soft Autumn palette – such as English Manor, Ocean wave, or Dusk Blue.

Winter Color Palettes – Dark Winter, True Winter, Bright Winter

Winter Color Palettes

No matter what your favorite season is, it’s hard to deny that winter has some gorgeous hues. There are three types of winter palettes: true winter, dark winter, and bright winter. Dark winter palettes feature a dark background color with dark reds and blues. Bright winter palettes feature a light background color, with bright red and blue accents. True winter palettes are similar to bright winter, but you’ll get a deep purple or indigo as the accent color instead of red. Check out these and other winter color palettes to find ideas for your perfect look!

Dark Winter Colour Palette

dark winter color palette

Dark Winter is the color season reminiscent of deep winter nights, when the stars contrast with the black-and-blue sky, creating an atmosphere of mystery and magic. These colors are dark and cool, just like when the moon tints the night sky bright and illuminates the dark, misty forests beneath. Dark Winter colors are the colors of the night.

‍The Color Palette

Dark Winter = depth + coolness.

The dark Winter season’s color palette is dark and intense with hints of warmth. Dark Winter sits on the Autumn end of the Winter family. However, it needs the frosty influence of Winter rather than Autumn’s rich, earthy tones.

Dark Winter’s primary colors are dark, neutral-cool, and somewhat bright to match this season’s natural coloring.

The color palette includes highly saturated, highly contrasted, and relatively bright colors. Though quite broad, the palette heavily features pinks, reds, purples, and blues. The high contrast between the colors replicates the natural contrast level of a Dark Winter.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, Dark Winter has the following settings:

Hue

The colors lean towards the cool end of the scale but are not extremely cool. This means they contain more blue than yellow. So even if you choose yellow (which is the warmest color of all), you will find only cooler shades with a tint of blue. You will also not find many shades of yellow-based colors but more shades of blue and grey, which are naturally cool.

Value

The overall palette is dark in line with this season’s primary color aspect. And while many of the colors are very light (white and the icy pastels), there are many more dark ones. This mixture in value is required to achieve the high contrast a Dark Winter needs.

Chroma

Typical for Winter colors, the palette is slightly higher in chroma, meaning the colors are somewhat saturated and bright. However, they are dark rather than very bright.

Sister Palettes

Dark Winter sits between Dark Autumn and True Winter on the seasonal flow chart. It falls at the Autumn end of the Winter palette. Consequently, the colors are softer, darker, and warmer than True Winter’s.
Compared to Dark Autumn, the colors are similarly dark but cooler and brighter. And the light colors of Dark Winter are lighter than those of Dark Autumn. Autumn’s effect on Dark Winter is additional warmth and some softness.

Compared to the third Winter season Bright Winter, the colors share the same neutral-cool hue but are darker and softer.

Dark Autumn and True Winter share Dark Winter’s aspects of dark and cool, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the Dark Winter spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the Dark Winter color palette.

If you lean more towards Dark Autumn, opt for the cooler colors on the Dark Autumn palette – such as Plum Caspia, Blue Depths, and Corsair. Whereas if you lean more towards True Winter, select the darker colors on the True Winter palette – such as Acai, Aventurine, and Bellweather Blue.

True Winter Colour Palette

True Winter is the color season reminiscent of Winter in its prime. White, snowy landscapes contrast with bare trees and the darkest of nights. These colors play at the extremes of light, dark, and bright. True Winter colors are also present in the moonless night sky and at the Earth’s poles.

‍The Color Palette

true winter color palette

True Winter is the original Winter season of the four seasons color analysis and is the ‘standard’ Winter palette. The other two Winter palettes have been modified to accommodate the respective Autumn and Spring influence.

True Winter coloring combines coolness with brightness. This season falls at the coolest, iciest end of Winter. Therefore, the colors are cool with a clear blue undertone. They are pretty harsh covered with frost.

The True Winter palette contains a broad range of colors, from icy pinks and purples to frosty blues. And even though the contrast between the colors is high, the dark tones are balanced with brighter and much lighter accent colors.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, True Winter has the following settings.

Hue

True to this season’s primary aspect, the colors are very cool, meaning they contain blue undertones but no yellow undertones. So even if you choose yellow (the warmest color), you will find only cool shades. In addition, there are very few yellow-based colors on the palette and more shades of blue and icy pinks, which are naturally cool-based.

Value

The palette ranges from the lightest value (true white) to the darkest (true black). Overall, the palette is on the darker side because bright blue – the undertone of this palette – is medium-dark.

Chroma

The colors are relatively high in chroma, meaning they are saturated, bright, and vibrant, keeping with this season’s secondary color aspect.

Sister Palettes

True Winter sits between Dark Winter and Bright Winter on the seasonal flow chart. It is the heart of the Winter palette, and the colors are brighter, cooler, and slightly lighter than those of Dark Winter.

With its opposite season True Summer, the colors share the same cool value but are darker and brighter. And unlike True Summer, the colors are cleaner and mixed with blue and black. The contrast between them is much higher.

Bright Winter’s palette is cooler, slightly darker, and not quite as bright compared to the third winter season as the Bright Winter turns the saturation up to the maximum.

Dark Winter and Bright Winter both share True Winter’s aspects of cool and bright, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the True Winter spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the True Winter color palette.

If you lean more towards Dark Winter, opt for the lighter colors on the Dark Winter palette – such as Marine Green, Splish Splash, and Ibis Rose. Whereas if you lean more towards Bright Winter, select the less intense colors on the Bright Winter palette – such as Dazzling Blue, Blue Iris, and Everglade.

Bright Winter Colour Palette

Bright Winter is the color season reminiscent of when the winter sun illuminates the snow-white expanses. The play of sunlight on cold winter landscapes creates a bright and sparkling image. These are the vibrant and almost unnatural colors of extreme weather situations like the Northern lights in the night sky. They are the colors of the cosmos and the galaxy.

bright-winter-color-dimentions


The Color Palette

Bright Winter coloring combines brightness with coolness. And if anything, Bright Winter colors are extreme – extremely intense, light, dark, and vibrant.

Bright Winter sits on the cusp between Winter and Spring. Like those of all Winter seasons, its colors are mainly cool, dark, and bright. But Spring increases the brightness of the already bright Winter palette, which creates the most intense, vibrant shades of all the seasons.

The palette contains acid greens, neon yellows, and bright fuchsias that would overpower any other season. Spring also warms up the colors slightly so that they are not as frosty as True Winter colors.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of color, Bright Winter has the following settings.

Hue

The colors lean towards the cool end of the scale but are not highly cool. As a result, you will find fewer shades of yellow (which is the warmest color of all) on the palette. And you will only see cooler shades of yellow, which have a tint of blue. Instead, there are more blues, pinks, and purples naturally blue-based and therefore cool.

Value

While the colors range from very light (bright white) to very dark (true black), the majority is medium in value, leaning slightly to the dark end because of the greater concentration of blue undertones.

Chroma

In line with Bright Winter’s primary aspect, the colors are very high in chroma, which is highly saturated, bright, and vibrant. These are the most intense colors of all the seasons.

Sister Palettes

bright-winter-color-analysis

Bright Winter sits between True Winter and Bright Spring on the seasonal flow chart. It falls at the Spring end of the Winter palette. Therefore, the colors are brighter, lighter, and warmer than True Winter’s.

The colors are similarly bright but cooler and slightly darker than Bright Spring. Spring’s effect on Bright Winter adds some warmth to the palette, brightens the colors, and lightens them somewhat.

Compared to the third Winter season Dark Winter, the colors share the same neutral-cool temperature but are lighter and brighter.

True Winter and Bright Spring both share Bright Winter’s aspects of cool and bright, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the Bright Winter spectrum, you can borrow some colors from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the Bright Winter color palette.

If you lean more towards True Winter, opt for the brighter colors on the True Winter palette – such as Limelight, Rose Red, and Palace Blue. Whereas if you lean more towards Bright Spring, select the cooler colors on the Bright Spring palette – such as Royal Purple, French Blue, and Green Jacket.

What Is Colour Analysis? – 12 Season Color Analysis

Seasonal Color Analysis

A clothing color is harmonious if it emphasizes certain aspects of your coloring. These aspects are sorted into twelve seasons, each with a specific color palette. Which season you fall into depends on the natural shade of your eyes, hair, and skin.

It is essential to mention that seasonal color analysis does not match colors to personality or body shape. Instead, this process is about determining three aspects of your natural coloring and comparing it to clothing colors with similar aspects.

We need to understand the three aspects or dimensions of color to understand seasonal color analysis. They are:

I. Hue & temperature (undertone)

The hue defines the color family of an object or what color it reflects – green, purple, orange, etc.

Usually, we perceive some colors as warmer and others as cooler. This is often referred to as a color’s temperature or undertone. These can be either warm, cool, or some combination of the two (neutral).

We associate yellow, orange, and red with warmth, whereas purple, blue, and green appear cool. And you will often find the color wheel divided:

However, this does not mean that all yellows are warm and all blues are cool. Any color can have warm or cool undertones – consider an acidic yellow (yellow mixed with green) and a tangerine yellow (yellow with orange). The former will have a cooler quality than the latter.

When it comes to seasonal color analysis, there is a consensus that yellow is the warmest color and blue is the coolest. Warm skin tones are towards yellow undertones, while cool-toned skin has blueish undertones.

Thus, blue-based colors are classed as cool – the more blue, the cooler the color. Yellow-based colors are warm. And warmer colors contain more yellow.

If a color’s undertone is imperceptible, it is a neutral color, neither warm nor cool. For example, green and red: while pure green consists of yellow and blue in equal parts, pure red contains neither blue nor yellow.

II. Value (Depth)

Value designates the depth of a color or how light or dark it is.

Light colors have had white added to them and are referred to as tints. Similarly, dark colors have had black added to them and are called shades.

III. Chroma / Clarity

Chroma defines a color’s saturation or how bright (clear) or muted. Chroma is how ‘close to grey’ a color is.

Clear, bright colors are far from looking grey because they are highly saturated. The more saturation is away, the closer a color gets to grey, the more muted it becomes.

Adding grey to a color turns it into a tone.

To summarise then: With the basics of color theory, we can look at the seasonal color analysis.

Seasonal color analysis is not a new concept. Our modern understanding of harmonious colors comes from 19th-century impressionist painters’ knowledge of the seasons. To accurately depict each season, understand the colors reflective of each one.

As nature moves through the season, it changes its set of colors. Think about the colors of landscapes, the four distinct seasons of the fresh tints of Spring, the gentle tones of summer, the earthy shades of Autumn, and the icy hues of Winter. The change in colors occurs because of how light reflects the natural world. Each time the sun changes its position, it paints the world in a new light.

Since we humans are also part of the natural world, these colors apply to ourselves. But until the 1980s, the application of the four seasons to fashion color choices has gained mainstream popularity. And that was mainly due to Carole Jackson’s successful book ‘Color me beautiful,’ whose analysis focused on two of the three dimensions of color discussed above.

The book’s test determines whether someone’s coloring is

  • WARM or COOL (temperature); and
  • LIGHT or DARK (value).

In Jackson’s book, which seasonal type do you depend therefore on two variables:

1. the undertone of your skin, hair, and eyes (either warm/golden or cool/ashy); and

2. how light or dark your overall coloring – and particularly your hair – is.

The seasons represent the four possible variations of these two variables: If your natural hair color is lighter than medium brown, you are either a Spring or a Summer; if it is darker, you are an Autumn or a Winter.

If your skin and hair have a warm undertone, or you are a natural red-head, you are either a Spring or an Autumn; if your skin has a blueish, cool undertone, and your hair is ashier without any golden or red highlights, you are either a Summer or a Winter.

Some people fall without a doubt into one of these four categories. But what if you are warm and light, yet the colors of Spring are too intense for you? Summer colors are less saturated, but they are cool. What now?

Most people don’t fall neatly into one of the four original seasons – not to mention the fact that the model did not consider people of color. The model was refined and developed into a more accurate twelve seasons color analysis to address some of these issues.

12 Seasons Colour Analysis

12 seasonal color analysis

The fundamental analysis does not work for everyone because one fundamental aspect is missing. And that is the third color dimension of ‘chroma.’ Chroma distinguishes strong, saturated from weak, greyish colors.

High Chroma = clear and bright.

Low Chroma = muted and soft

Looking at each season’s color palette, you will notice that while Spring and Winter’s colors are clear and bright, Summer and Autumn’s colors are more subdued and muted. Adding Chroma to the four seasons color analysis creates a more accurate twelve seasons color model. The three aspects of color then result in six, instead of four, characteristics:

  • WARM or COOL (temperature);
  • LIGHT or DARK (value); and
  • BRIGHT or MUTED (Chroma).

Flow theory

In the original color analysis, the four seasons are distinct and separate. You can only be one or another. The twelve seasons color model, in contrast, acknowledges that not everyone falls distinctly into one of the four seasons; and adding the third color dimension of chroma allows for the fact that the seasons overlap or flow into each other. But before we find out why that is, let’s look at the twelve color seasons.

In the graphic below, you will notice that the original four seasons have been divided into three sub-seasons each, where the warm/cool (the ‘true’) sub-seasons represent the original four seasons:

So in this model, Spring is not only light and warm but also bright, creating the following sub-seasons:

  • Bright Spring = bright + warm
  • True Spring = warm + bright
  • Light Spring = light + warm

Summer is not only light and cool but also muted. Sub-seasons are:

  • Light Summer = light + cool
  • True Summer = cool + muted
  • Soft Summer = muted + cool

Autumn is warm and dark and also muted. Sub-seasons are:

  • Soft Autumn = muted + warm
  • True Autumn = warm + muted
  • Dark Autumn = dark + warm

And while Winter is dark and cool, it is also bright. Its sub-seasons are:

  • Dark Winter = dark + cool
  • True Winter = cool + bright
  • Bright Winter = bright + cool

And how does this model flow? As you can see, out of the three aspects of color, each sub-season features two main aspects. Take True Summer. Its primary aspect is cool, but it is also muted. Soft Summer is predominantly muted, but it’s also cool. And similarly, Soft Autumn is mainly muted, but it’s warm in contrast to Soft summer. So you can see how each color season flows seamlessly into the next along the three dimensions of color.

A new season is created at the points where the original seasons overlap. For example, Dark Autumn is a blend of Autumn and Winter. Someone falling into this season has the typical warmth of an Autumn but the intensity characteristic of a Winter.

If we take a look at the natural world again, we know that, for instance, summer does not start overnight when Spring is over (as the four seasons color model suggests). In reality, Spring moves gradually into summer and the early spring days feel and look different from the late spring days when the trees are covered in luscious green foliage. So it makes sense that the seasons flow into one another.

‍Matching Colours to the Seasons

Each season’s color palette is a replica of colors found in nature as it moves through the seasons. That means that each seasonal color palette consists of a set of harmonious colors. But what makes them harmonize?

Let’s examine autumnal colors. When we look at an autumn landscape, we see rich, warm, and darkish hues. We wouldn’t associate an icy blue with Autumn simply because it does not exist in the natural autumnal world.

What then do autumn colors have in common that makes them harmonious? Firstly, they are similar in hue/temperature (warm) and identical in chroma (muted). And while there are certainly lighter and darker colors, many of them cluster around a particular value level (dark). The same is true for each of the twelve color palettes.‍

Which colors belong to which season?

To understand which colors belong to each season, we need to go back to the three dimensions of color. Let’s start with temperature (warm vs. cool).

If you remember, warm color is based on yellow, whereas a cool color is based on blue. So a completely warm color has yellow undertones and no blue ones, and it will belong to either True Spring or True Autumn since these are the two ‘warm’ seasons. Completely cool colors have blue undertones and no yellow ones, and they will belong to either True Summer or True Winter – the ‘cool’ seasons.

Remember that within each hue, warm and cool are relative concepts. The color is warm or cool based on how much yellow or blue is added. For example, a warm yellow will be very yellowish, whereas a cool yellow will appear somewhat greenish. Why? Because if you mix blue into yellow, you get green. And vice versa, if you mix yellow into blue, it will appear greenish because of the yellow undertones.

So while you might find yellows on the Summer and Winter palettes, these will be very cool, greenish yellows compared to the warm, golden yellows of Autumn and Spring.

We know that cool colors belong either to True Summer or True Winter and that warm colors belong to True Spring or True Autumn. But how do we determine to which of these two seasons they belong?

We need to look at their value (lightness or darkness) and chroma (brightness or greyishness).

Let’s look at value first. We know that warm colors contain a lot of yellow. And yellow in its purest form is a light color, whereas blue in its purest form is a dark color. If you mix blue with yellow, it will become darker; and it will become lighter if you mix yellow into blue.

But that is not the only thing that happens here. Do you notice that the two hues in the middle of the chart are ‘muddier’ than the two hues on the outside? They are no longer pure or bright colors but muted tones. Adding the third dimension of color to the chart then results in:

As you can see, the purest forms of yellow and blue have the highest chroma. Where these pure colors mix, they not only change in value but also in chroma. They become less clear and less bright.

If we rearrange the chart once more, we can see the workings behind the basic seasonal color analysis model: While True Spring and True Winter contain the clearest, purest forms of yellow and blue, respectively, both True Autumn and True Summer have muted colors, which are blends of blue and yellow.

That means that:

  • Spring is completely warm and bright and has many lighter colors (yellow is inherently warm and light). That’s why we find lots of tints in Spring.
  • Autumn – being completely warm but muted, has darker colors (because light yellow has been mixed with dark blue causing the colors to become muddied and darker). That’s why we find tones as well as shades in Autumn.
  • Being completely cool and bright, Winter has many darker colors (because blue is inherently cool and dark). However, Winter is the season of high contrast and high intensity. Consequently, we not only find shades but also tints in this season.
  • Summer – being completely cool but muted, has lighter colors (because inherently dark blue has been mixed with inherently light yellow causing the colors to become more muted and more washed-out). That’s why we find lots of tones in Summer.

In summary, the colors you find on each color palette will have the following qualities:

How does this translate into the twelve seasons color analysis?

The same principles apply to the 12 seasons color model. Each season is further divided into three sub-seasons. There are three color palettes for each season instead of one. All three palettes will be pretty similar, but depending on the sub-season’s primary color aspect, the colors will be slightly brighter/more muted, lighter/darker, or warmer/cooler.

The summer season, for example, is divided into Light Summer, True Summer, and Soft Summer, these three seasons’ color aspects are similar, but not same. While all three palettes are on the cool side, True Summer is the coolest. This season’s primary color aspect is ‘cool.’ Light Summer is the lightest of the three, and Soft Summer is the most muted.

Complete Guide On How To Build A Wardrobe

Complete Guide On How To Build A Wardrobe

The actual physical work on your wardrobe begins with a thorough declutter. This is probably the most intense and overwhelming step. Decluttering gives you a better idea of where the gaps in your wardrobe are. Now fill the gaps with new garments. To ensure that you always have something appropriate to wear, we will see how to build your wardrobe and organize it.

I. Declutter Closet

Decluttering a wardrobe involves some serious inspection of the items you own. How to declutter closet will help you declutter your wardrobe effectively for your ideal wardrobe plan.

II. Shop the missing Items

Think about what you need before you hit the shops. Heading to the shops only knowing that you need a jumper, but not which one will make it more likely to buy the wrong item. It doesn’t have to be super precise, but you should know

  • the kind of item you need,
  • what color it must be in,
  • the fit and cut, and
  • the material.

Make a shopping list.

Don’t come out with three other things you didn’t intend to buy. Create a shopping list and stick to it; you have created it to fill in your wardrobe gaps; anything else is just unnecessary clutter.

Take your time

Everything you buy should match your requirement, not the following best available. Your garments should be high-quality, long-lasting items fitting your wardrobe. So take your time, do your research, and keep trying on clothes until you find that perfect item you’ve been looking for to avoid quickly replacing them.

Look for quality

You can find poor quality items in high-end shops just like you can find high-quality items in high-street shops. The trick is to know what good quality looks like. Scrutinize a garment before you make a purchase. Don’t bother with it if it doesn’t look and feel like it will last long. Spending a lot of time finding that right garment will make you see why you would want it to last for a long time.

Don’t fall for trend items.

When you detect gaps, don’t fill them with trend items. If your wardrobe doesn’t already contain Safari look items, don’t go and buy them now that they are in fashion. If a particular trend fits into your wardrobe, and you know you will wear these items for a long time, get them, but don’t buy incompatible garments that will end up unused.

III. How to organize your wardrobe

If you’re unable to find items for your outfit, having them is useless. An organized wardrobe with everything visible and accessible is key to your ongoing relationship with getting dressed.

Arrange your wardrobe

You could arrange your clothes by garment type, color group, or outfit combinations. Have a designated section for your weekly outfits if you like planning out your outfits in advance. Avoiding ‘I have nothing to wear’ days.

Avoid the chair

Are you throwing not-so-dirty clothes over a chair where they accumulate into an uncontrolled mess? This practice will overthrow your whole wardrobe organization. Instead, have a designated area for worn clothes neatly placed. This way, it is more appealing to reach for them and easy to find an item when you need it.

Invest in the correct hangers

Invest in suitable hangers to keep your clothes properly and avoid steaming or re-ironing. Using the right hangers for different garments will keep them wrinkle-free and extend the life of your garments, especially delicate clothing such as silk dresses or blouses.

Plastic & metal hangers

Plastic and metal hangers are the cheapest hanger options. They take up little space in your wardrobe, and you can get them in different colors. But they are not always the best solution: they don’t offer excellent support for your clothes, and you may have to deal with fallen off garments.

Wooden hangers

Wooden hangers are slightly wider than standard plastic or metal hangers and offer more support for your clothes. They can also be infused with aromatic cedar, which is a natural repellent for insects and moths, that may otherwise damage your garments.

Wooden hangers often have wide arms and a contoured neck, perfect for hanging suits, jackets, and coats. They also come with a bar for hanging trousers, saving space in your wardrobe.

Flocked hangers

Flocked hangers are covered in non-slip velvet, ideal for hanging silk or other light and delicate items. This material prevents garments from slipping off the hangers as it grips the lighter material. Flocked hangers come in different sizes and can also have trouser bars and nooks for clothing loops.

Padded hangers

Padded clothing hangers are ideal for special and delicate garments – such as tops, dresses, lingerie, and bridal wear. These hangers have an envelope of soft satin or cotton cushioning, which protects delicate garments from marks or creases from the hanger and adds a luxurious feel to your wardrobe.

Specialist hangers

If you want to take your wardrobe organization to the next step, you can also invest in specialist hangers. They are available for scarves, belts, and even shoes.

You’ll need a full-length mirror and good lighting close to your wardrobe to see your outfits properly.

IV. How to Organize Seasonal Clothes

Seasonal climate changes will affect your clothing choices, such as you might own winter coats or have shorts for those sweltering days. Year-round clothing in your wardrobe may create visual clutter, which leads to stress, and you say, ‘I have nothing to wear.’ To avoid this organize your clothes by following steps here on how to organize seasonal clothes.

V. Adding items to your wardrobe

We are sold in fast fashion, available in abundance at low prices. And you’ll prefer replacing to repair things. Unconsciously, you’re wasting time shopping for the same thing again. Instead, purchase only stuff you value, appreciate, and love that you don’t want to replace quickly. So make only necessary, worthy purchases.

Prepare & plan

The following guidelines will help you make a plan and purchase the right items without any impulsive purchases:

Integrate new items into your master plan

Is the item a replacement for a broken item, or does it fill a gap in your wardrobe? Great, get it. If not, where does it fit in with the rest of your wardrobe? Look at each item subjectively, consider its use in your wardrobe, how it fits with your color palette, and if it works for your body shape.

Don’t buy straight away.

Never purchase something right away. Wait a week and ask yourself: Do I still want this item?

Research online

Research on the required item, where you’ll get it, which is best, are there alternatives, etc. Shop around to find the item that best matches what you are looking for instead of opting for the first thing you see.

Beware of marketing tricks.

These are fantastic tools for wardrobe and style inspiration but can trigger the feeling of needing something new when you don’t.

Understand quality

Fast fashion has dropped the quality significantly. Price does not strictly equal quality. Not every affordable item is necessary of poor quality, and likewise, not every expensive item is of the highest quality.
Look for signs of quality first then the price tag. The stitches, fabrics and their qualities, and understand how a garment is constructed.

Buy less, buy better.

Don’t buy ten different t-shirts of poor quality, buy one you truly love. This way, you will ensure that it lasts as long as possible.

How to Organize Seasonal Clothes – Seasonal Wardrobe Changes

How to Organize Seasonal Clothes – Seasonal Wardrobe Changes

Seasonal climate changes will affect your clothing choices, such as you might own winter coats or have shorts for those sweltering days. Year-round clothing in your wardrobe may create visual clutter, which leads to stress, and you say, ‘I have nothing to wear.’ This is the fourth step in a complete guide to how to build a wardrobe.

‍Less number of quality pieces in your wardrobe help you make an outfit decision quickly your favorites. Thus eliminating unnecessary seasonal items from your wardrobe will free your brain and save time.
Keeping layering clothing of mild or varying weather can also reduce your stress with appropriate mix and match options.

Storing your clothes

The best thing is to pack them up and store them far away in the attic or basement to get them out of sight. When you are putting your clothes away, properly keep them to increase the life of your garments with the following tips:

Clean & mend your clothes

Clean before you store away any clothing. Stains set in and only worsen over time, so that stain that isn’t too bad now might worsen when you pull the item out of storage in a year. With food stains or crumbs in your pockets, pests may reach. Packing them away in freshness will extend clothing’s lifetime as it is less interesting for mice and vermin.

Wash and dry all seasonal items for storage according to the care label instructions. Ensure they are all rinsed thoroughly to prevent any chemical damage during storage and that they are completely dry to avoid the build-up of mold or mildew.

Ironing is unnecessary as there are chances of getting wrinkled again inside the storage boxes. Iron them when you take them out again.

Any clothing requiring mending, attend this before putting them away. Otherwise, you may pull out the damaged clothes next year.

Invest in the right boxes

It will help if you store clothes in plastic rather than wood, paper, or cardboard boxes. While it’s plastic, this material is waterproof and offers the best protection from pests. Cardboard and wood contain chemicals that can transfer to garments and damage them. And the boxes may also become a home for pests attracted to proteins in the glue that holds them together.

Invest in lidded plastic boxes that are not completely air-tight. Many fabrics – such as wool and other natural fibers, need to breathe. If you are concerned about buying plastic, bear in mind that these boxes will (hopefully) be reused many times before their useful lives end. And they will prolong the life of your clothes and protect them from irreparable damage – resulting in fewer clothes thrown away.

Make sure to clean the boxes before each use to avoid staining thoroughly.

Label the boxes & make an inventory

Making an inventory for all of your boxes may seem like a lot of effort, but trust me, you will be grateful for spending this time now looking for that specific jumper. Plus, you only have to make your main inventory once. Any additions can be added to the existing list when required. In addition, make sure you label each of your boxes, so you know straight away what’s in it.

Pack up your clothes

Vacuum seal bags and plastic bags aren’t always the best options for long-term storage or storing delicate items. Most fabrics need air circulation to maintain their structure and prevent moisture from getting trapped.
Folding clothes neatly into the boxes will not damage them. Stack the folded items, starting with the heaviest items at the bottom to the lightest items on top. Do not stuff them up; stacking clothes loosely will allow air to keep circulating for extended storage.

‍Hanging your clothes is not recommended, especially not for heavy items such as jumpers and other knitwear. The longer an item hangs and the heavier it is, the more likely it will misshapen. If you can, fold everything away. If you want to take the extra care, you can line your storage boxes with old, clean cotton sheets first (for additional delicate items, use acid-free tissue paper instead).

And to go the extra mile, you can put wooden cedar balls into each box. They have the double benefit of repelling months and keeping your clothes smelling fresh. Be careful if you are opting for mothballs, though.
Many children and pets are naturally attracted to them, resulting in fatal accidents.

Choose a suitable storage place.

The storage place must be clean, cool, dark, and dry, protecting your clothing from fading attracting mildew and insects. Clean the area thoroughly before putting the boxes there. Not exposed to heat, avoid places near heating sources. Also, ensure the boxes are not in direct contact with the wood as all wood contains acids that can damage fabrics over a long time.

Check on your stored items.

Regularly check on your stored clothing to ensure there are no issues. When you are ready to pull the dress out of storage, clean all items before wearing them. Inspect your storage containers to protect them from cracks, stains, or damage.

How To Declutter Closet

Declutter Closet

Decluttering a wardrobe involves some serious inspection of the items you own. The following steps will help you declutter your wardrobe effectively for your ideal wardrobe plan. This is the first and foremost step in a complete guide to how to build a wardrobe.

Step 1: Empty the wardrobe completely – Don’t cheat

Take everything out of your wardrobe and lay it out on your bed. Don’t forget clothes in the wash or packed in storage boxes. Taking everything out will help you perform a proper audit of your wardrobe.

Even if you are decluttering in stages, still take everything out sort it into piles by season or category. Put the yet to declutter items back into your wardrobe’s designated ‘to-do’ section.

Group the items by garment type and then subcategories; for example, trousers group, breaking down into jeans and formal trousers.

Step 2: Try all the items – Don’t skip them.

Scrutinize by trying – see how you feel in it if it fits you (too tight, too loose, too big, etc.), or if it’s damaged. Ensure you still don’t put the unfit items in the back to rot there. Use a full-length mirror and have good lighting with natural light, always best as it’s the most accurate in terms of colors and how you look.

Ask yourself

  • When was the last time I wore this? If you can’t remember, it’s time to let go.
  • Does it fit properly? If not, can alterations be made to improve the item’s fit?
  • Does the item make me feel confident, and do I feel comfortable wearing it?
  • Is the style flattering for my body shape?
  • Does the color suit my skin undertone and work with my color palette?
  • Is the item worn out? Can it be repaired? Remove any items damaged beyond repair.

Step 3: Sort your clothes into piles

Yes Pile –  Items meet all criteria. The fit, color, style, confidence, and comfort. These are typically the items you frequently wear, which should fit perfectly into your master plan.

Maybe Pile –  Items that don’t fit quite right, have no style, are a little off color or have sentimental value.

No Pile – This pile contains all the items you have been meaning to clear out, ones that are beyond repair or don’t fit your style, body shape, or color palette. Put these aside to come back to later.

Seasonal Pile – Group your seasonal items not relevant to the season. If you are decluttering your wardrobe in summer, you probably won’t keep your winter coat in your closet (or if you do, it’s time to pack it away and put it into storage). So anything that you want to keep but is not in season right now will go in this pile.

Step 4: Assess what’s left in your wardrobe

Decluttered and grouped into various piles? Now treat each group with the following guidelines.

Clothes to sell

Selling your old clothes is an excellent way to recycle them (they’ll get a new owner) and make money from them if they are expensive. Use apps and marketplaces of secondhand clothing.

Clothes to swap

Swapping clothes with your friends or family is another great option to extend the life of your unwanted clothes. It’s a win-win situation.

Clothes to donate

If you don’t want to sell your clothes or are not worth selling, consider donating them. Take these items to a charity or give them away to family, friends, or someone who can use them.

Clothes to use as rags

You might not be able to donate items that are beyond repair. Use as rags for household cleaning.

Clothes to throw away

Throw them away, but check if the items are recyclable. If yes, some retailers encourage recycling clothes and even offer you discounts on your shopping if you trade-in.

The Maybe Pile

Re-assess whether they belong in the Yes or No pile. Examine each item. If you think you can make the item work with some improvement, create a new pile for alterations. But, sometimes, new buttons may make an item perfectly wearable again.

Bear in mind that even though it may be easier to move an item to the No pile, there is no point if a similar item will end up on your shopping list.

The Seasonal Pile

Any items you want to keep but are not in season right now have to be checked against the master plan. If they fit the bill, pack them up into boxes and put them into storage. If you have more seasonal items than necessary, decide whether to keep them or give them away.

The Yes Pile

The Yes pile contains the clothes that will be part of your ideal wardrobe. Tick each item off against your master plan to assess what you are missing or what you might have too much of. Where you have too much, decide if you want to keep these items or if you want to give them away.

Common Types Of Fabrics

Common Types of Fabric

Denim

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine-washable
  • Breathability: 2/5
  • Comfort: 3/5

Technically, denim is not raw material but a type of weave. Denim is traditionally woven with 100%-cotton yarn; however, today, it’s blended with polyester to control shrinkage and wrinkles and Spandex to add stretch. Indigo and white yarns are interwoven in a twill weave to get that typical denim look. Many varieties of heavy fabric are available – from light to dark blue and in different washes.

Where to wear it:

Denim is an all-year-round staple, especially in the form of jeans. However, it is not the best choice for hot summer days because it is a heavy fabric.

Advantages:
  • Strong & durable
  • High resiliency
  • Absorbent & dries quickly
  • Resistant to shrinkage
  • Dyes & print well
Disadvantages:
  • Susceptible to stretching
  • Not colorfast
  • Requires chemicals to be produced
  • Not environmentally friendly

Flannel

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 4/5

Flannel is a dull, woven fabric with a slightly fuzzy and soft appearance.

Originally made from carded wool or worsted yarn, flannel is often from wool, cotton, or polyester.

Where to wear it:

Since flannel easily retains heat and has excellent insulation properties, it is perfect for autumn and winter clothing. Shirts, hoodies, jackets, trousers, and even skirts use this fabrics.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • Soft & comfortable
  • Drapes well
  • Strong & durable
  • Resistant to wrinkles & creases
  • Absorbent & dries quickly
  • Resistant to stains
Disadvantages:
  • Static & pilling
  • Wears down easily

Jersey

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming & Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 5/5

Jersey is not a material by itself but a knit that produces a smooth, flat face on fabric and a textured back to the fabric. Although it was originally made from wool, it is also made from cotton and various synthetic fibers.

Where to wear it:

Often a cotton/wool blend that makes a rugged yet lightweight material, the jersey is an excellent choice for summer clothing as it is light and flexible. This means it can be worked into most designs while being highly comfortable. Typically, it is used for T-shirts, polo shirts, and other knitted tops.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • Soft & comfortable
  • Drapes well
  • Strong & durable
  • Resistant to wrinkles & creases
Disadvantages:

Satin

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine Wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 5/5

Technically, satin is not a material but a type of weave. It can be made of silk, nylon, or polyester. It’s a shimmery and shiny fabric, and depending on what it is made of, it can range from light- to heavyweight.

Where to wear it:

Satin is commonly used in delicate garments – such as women’s lingerie, nightgowns, blouses, evening gowns, in boxer shorts, shirts, and neckties. When made out of silk, it is a warming material and not recommended for hot summer months since it traps air between the body and fabric.

Advantages
  • Lightweight
  • Smooth & silky
  • Drapes well
  • Resistant to creases
Disadvantages:
  • Requires dry cleaning
  • Water stains remain visible
  • Overly clingy
  • Slightly rough feel
  • Wrinkles & creases
  • Weakened by perspiration

Chiffon

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 5/5

Chiffon is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions, giving it some stretch and a little rough feel. Chiffon is made from cotton, silk, or synthetic fibers – such as nylon and polyester.

Where to wear it:

Chiffon can be used in many different ways to add a touch of elegance while ensuring the summer heat is not overwhelming. Ideal for dresses, particularly bridal wear, it is also perfect for use in creating nightgowns and other evening wear for hot summer nights.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • Strong & durable
  • Dyes & print well
  • Resistant to creases
Disadvantages:
  • Static
  • Overly clingy
  • Slightly rough feel
  • Requires dry cleaning
  • Wrinkles & creases
  • Weakened by perspiration

Velvet

  • Natural / synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 3/5

Velvet is a woven, tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short, dense pile, giving it a distinctive soft, fuzzy feel. It can be made of silk, cotton, nylon, or rayon. Pure silk velvet is rare and extremely expensive.

Where to wear it:

Velvet has a luxurious feel and has been used for centuries to create some of the most splendid evening wear. Even accessories, such as bags and scarves, have been made from velvet.

Advantages:
Disadvantages:
  • Tends to shed
  • It tends to crush and flatten over time
  • Weak fabric & easily impaired
  • Attracts hair & fluff
  • May require dry cleaning

Faux Leather

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 3/5

Faux, artificial, or synthetic leather is made from PVC and aims at imitating real leather.

Where to wear it:

Any real leather garment is also available as a faux option, such as leather jackets or trousers. However, while real leather is breathable, one disadvantage of artificial leather is that it is not porous and does not allow air to pass through. Thus, sweat can accumulate easily, and faux leather can be overwhelming in hot weather. It is also worth mentioning that PVC requires fossil fuels in its production, and carcinogenic substances are released, meaning this type of fabric is particularly environmentally unfriendly. Nevertheless, it does away with the animal welfare issues surrounding real leather.

Advantages:
  • Very strong & durable
  • Low maintenance
Disadvantages:
  • Does not age well
  • Requires hand wash
  • Releases toxic chemicals during production

Faux Fur

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 3/5

Fake or faux fur is a pile fabric engineered to have the appearance and warmth of animal fur.

Where to wear it:

Faux fur is supposed to replicate real fur and is thus used for winter garments to keep you warm. While faux fur does not harm animals, it is also not environmentally friendly. It is often made of polyester (a type of plastic), and harmful chemicals are released during its production.

Advantages:
  • Strong & durable
  • Low maintenance
Disadvantages:
  • Releases toxic chemicals during production

Types Of Synthetic Fabrics

Types of synthetic fabrics

Acetate

  • Function: Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 4/5

An acetate is a form of rayon that covers a whole range of manufactured fibers made from regenerated cellulose fiber. Acetate is made from biodegrading naturally occurring wood pulp, making it a semi-synthetic fiber. Pure acetate fabric has a luxurious feel and appearance (similar to silk), but it’s also very delicate.

Where to wear it:

Acetate is often blended with other fibers – most commonly silk, wool, and cotton, to give these fabrics better wrinkle recovery and good draping quality at a lower price. Since acetate imitates silk, it is often used to produce soft garments like blouses and dresses and wedding and party attire. Frequently, it is also used for lining.

Advantages:
  • Drapes well
  • Quick-drying
  • Resists stretching & shrinkage
  • Resistant to moths & mildew
  • No static & pilling
  • Dyes & print well
Disadvantages:
  • Weak fabric
  • Sensitive to heat
  • Not colorfast
  • No elasticity
  • Wrinkles & creases easily
  • Must be hand washed

Acrylic

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 2/3
  • Comfort: 3/5

Acrylic is a fully synthetic fiber made from a polymer. Acrylic fiber closely resembles the appearance and feel of wool. The fabric is lightweight, warm, and soft to the touch. Therefore, it is used as a cheaper alternative to wool or blended with sheep wool or cashmere.

Where to wear it:

Since it is mainly used as a wool-substitute, common end product of acrylic fabric includes jumpers, hats, and socks. Due to its low absorbency properties – meaning it would not soak up sweat on hot summer days, it is only beneficial for winter clothing.

Advantages:
  • Durable
  • Colourfast
  • Resists shrinkage & wrinkles
  • Resistant to oil & soil
  • Moisture-wicking
  • Quick-drying
  • Resistant to mildew & insects
  • Easy to clean
Disadvantages:
  • Static & pilling
  • It May be clingy to the skin
  • Can irritate the skin
  • Water-repellent (encourages bacteria growth)

Lyocell

  • Semi-synthetic fiber
  • Function: Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 3/5
  • Comfort: 4/5

Lyocell is another type of rayon. It is also produced from wood pulp which makes it a semi-synthetic fiber. Interestingly, this fiber is fully biodegradable, making it a more eco-friendly synthetic fiber.

Where to wear it:

Lyocell is very similar to cotton and is often used to substitute for the latter. Hence it is used to make everything from shirts to underwear. While some garments are made entirely from lyocell, it is more common to see this fabric mixed with other fabrics like cotton or polyester.

Advantages:
  • Drapes well
  • Strong & durable
  • Resistant to wrinkles
  • Quick-drying
  • No static & pilling
  • Biodegradable

Modal

  • Semi-synthetic fiber
  • Function: Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 4/5
  • Comfort: 5/5

Another type of rayon, modal, is also produced from wood pulp, but specifically from beech trees.

Where to wear it:

Modal is stronger and more stable when wet than other rayon types yet has a soft feel, similar to cotton. It is also moisture-wicking making it an excellent choice for activewear. It’s also used in the manufacture of underwear, pajamas, and bathrobes and more generally as a cotton substitute.

Advantages
  • Lightweight
  • Smooth, soft & comfortable
  • Drapes well
  • Very strong & durable
  • High resiliency
  • Absorbent & dries quickly
  • Hypoallergenic & non-irritating
  • Dyes & print well
  • No static or pilling
Disadvantages:
  • Prone to stretching
  • Pilling

Nylon

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 2/5

Nylon is one of the most common synthetic fabrics. It is a rigid, lightweight, elastic synthetic polymer with a protein-like chemical structure. Nylon is often mixed with other fabrics – such as polyester, spandex, or cotton.

Where to wear it:

Nylon fabric is used as an alternative to silk stockings (its original application). Combined with other fibers, it can be found in blouses, evening dresses, and everyday clothing.

On its own, nylon isn’t the softest fabric, making it a better choice for stiffer outwear items like athletic shoes and sports jackets. However, it is not very absorbent, so not ideal for wicking away sweat. This is something to consider since nylon is often found in activewear.

Because it is rugged and water-resistant, it’s also a popular material for handbags.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • High resiliency
  • Very strong
  • Fast drying
  • Dyes & print well
  • Resists shrinkage & wrinkles
  • Resistant to abrasion & mildew
Disadvantages:
  • Low absorbency
  • Prone to tears & rips
  • Can have an unpleasant sheen
  • Prone to static
  • Produced from fossil fuels
  • Not biodegradable

Polyester

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Warming
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 1/5

Polyester fibers are obtained by mixing the two chemical substances, ethylene glycol, and terephthalic acid. Polyester is a type of plastic and hence a fully synthetic fiber in less scientific terms.

Where to wear it:

Polyester is ubiquitous and used in all types of clothing, either alone or blended with other types of fiber. It’s not an excellent choice for summer clothing because it is not a breathable material and will make you feel hot. It is, however, a superb wicking fabric that can be used to draw sweat away from the body and allow it to evaporate much more quickly. When blended with another fabric, it can make an effective choice for athletic wear.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • Crisp, but soft
  • High resiliency
  • Abrasion-resistant
  • Strong & durable
  • Quick-drying
  • Dyes & print well
  • Colourfast
  • Resists stretching & shrinkage, wrinkles & creases
  • Resistant to mildew
Disadvantages:
  • No breathability
  • Static & pilling
  • Very low absorbency
  • Can have an unpleasant sheen
  • Stains are difficult to remove
  • It tends to be slippery
  • Not biodegradable
  • Not eco-friendly

Spandex / Lycra / Elastane

  • Synthetic fiber
  • Function: Stretching
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 1/5
  • Comfort: 1/5

Spandex, Lycra, or elastane is a fully synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity or stretch. It is made from polymer polyurethane, making it a type of plastic.

Where to wear it:

Spandex fabric can stretch to five to eight times its normal size, and this is typically used to make other fabrics stretch beyond their natural abilities. In most cases, pure spandex isn’t used in garments. Instead, small quantities of this spandex are woven into other fabrics. It is used primarily to make form-fitting clothes, activewear, bras, and swimsuits.

Advantages:
  • Lightweight
  • Strong & durable
  • Resistant to sweat
  • Excellent elasticity
Disadvantages:
  • No breathability
  • Clingy to the skin
  • Slippery on surfaces
  • Sensitive to heat
  • Not biodegradable

Viscose

  • Semi-synthetic fiber
  • Function: Cooling
  • Wrinkle-resistant
  • Machine wash
  • Breathability: 4/5
  • Comfort: 5/5

Viscose is a semi-synthetic fabric and part of the rayon family. It is made from purified cellulose fibers, which are typically created from wood pulp.

Where to wear it:

Viscose was originally created as a cheaper alternative to silk. However, it can take on many properties depending on how it is made and can also be similar to cotton. The fiber swells and loses strength when wet, readily penetrated by water and sweat. Since it’s not very breathable, it won’t wick away moisture well. Rayon is thus best used in dry heat and is a good choice for summer clothing. It can be used to make everything from shirts through to dresses.

It is also often used for coats, jackets, and other outerwear.

Advantages:
  • Soft & comfortable
  • Drapes well
  • Highly absorbent
  • Dyes & print well
  • Colourfast
  • No static or pilling
Disadvantages:
  • Wrinkles & creases easily
  • Susceptible to mildew
  • Low resiliency
  • Sensitive to heat
  • Stretches
  • Weakens when wet
  • Fabric shrinks when washed
  • Not eco-friendly

Light Spring: A Comprehensive Guide

 

The Colour Palette

Light Spring is the colour season reminiscent of new life. These are the days when the warming sun makes the last of the spring flowers bud and the first hint of Summer lies in the air.

These colours are warm and fresh but still light and gentle – like the pastel colours of candy.

Light Spring Colours

The Palette

Light Spring combines lightness with warmth. And while this season has the freshness characteristic of all Spring seasons, it also has some of the softness of Summer.

True to this season’s primary colour aspect, the colours are light. And even though they are gentle, the colours are by no means muted. As part of the Spring family, this palette is pretty bright and colourful. It includes medium-saturated, low-contrast and warmish colours, like rose pinks and grass greens.

The Light Spring colour palette is essentially the standard Spring palette with some of the intensity and saturation removed. White has been added to the original Spring colours to make them lighter – the colours are not dark and heavy. In fact, the darkest of the Spring browns will often be too gloomy.

Colour Dimensions

On the three dimensions of colour, Light Spring has the following settings:

Light Spring Colour Dimensions

Hue

As part of the Spring family, the colours lean towards the warm end of the scale but are not extremely warm. That means they contain more yellow than blue undertones. And consequently, you will find fewer tints of blue (which is the coolest colour of all) on the palette. And the blues that you will find all have a tint of yellow to make them warmer and lighter.

Value

Thanks to this colour season’s primary colour aspect, the colours are overall low in value – meaning there are many light colours and very few darker ones. And the few medium colours only act as supporting colours for the light ones.

Chroma

The colour palette is medium-high in chroma. It is not as bright and vibrant as the other two Spring seasons. The colours are typical pastel colours because brightness combined with lightness is what creates pastel.

Sister Palettes

Light Spring sits between True Spring and Light Summer on the seasonal flow chart. It falls at the Summer end of the Spring palette, meaning the colours are softer, lighter and less warm than those of True Spring.

Compared to Light Summer, the colours are warmer, brighter and similarly light. The influence of Summer on the palette is extra softness. Pastel colours would look dull on the other Spring seasons but flatter Light Spring skin. Similarly, the high contrast of the other two Spring seasons does not work here because Light Spring has naturally low contrast.

Compared to the third Spring season Bright Spring, the colours are gentler and lighter. They are not as vibrant and not as contrasted.

As sister palettes, True Spring and Light Summer both share Light Spring’s aspects of warm and light, respectively. Depending on where you fall on the Light Spring spectrum, you can borrow some colours from your sister palettes since they are close enough to the Light Spring colour palette.

If you lean more towards True Spring, opt for the lighter shades on the True Spring palette – such as Impala, Salmon or Daiquiri Green. Whereas if you lean more towards Light Summer, choose the warmer colours on the Light Summer palette – such as Popcorn, Dubarry or Cockatoo.

Light Spring Sister Palettes